Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10593/2239
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKelessidou, Anna-
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-09T08:37:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-09T08:37:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationPeitho. Examina Antiqua, nr 1(2), 2011, s. 159-168.pl_PL
dc.identifier.issn2082–7539-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10593/2239-
dc.description.abstractWe have unfortunately very little information on the three accusers of Socrates: Meletus, Anytus, and Lycon. Notwithstanding this, the present paper attempts to discuss the circumstances and motives that led to Socrates’ trial. Furthermore, the article deals with Socrates’ crucial stand after the verdict and considers the philosopher’s arguments as these have been presented in the first tetralogy.pl_PL
dc.language.isoplpl_PL
dc.publisherWydawnictwo Naukowe Instytutu Filozofii UAMpl_PL
dc.subjectPlatopl_PL
dc.subjectSocrates’ trialpl_PL
dc.subjectMeletuspl_PL
dc.subjectAnytuspl_PL
dc.subjectLyconpl_PL
dc.titleOskarżyciele Sokratesapl_PL
dc.typeArtykułpl_PL
Appears in Collections:Peitho. Examina Antiqua, nr 1(2), 2011

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
kelessidou.pdf511.71 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show simple item record



Items in AMUR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.