Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10593/19242
Title: The self lost, the self adjusted: Forming a new identity in bereavement memoirs by American women
Authors: Małecka, Katarzyna
Keywords: self
loss
widow
bereavement
memoir
independence
grief
writing
narrative
self-pity
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Adam Mickiewicz University
Citation: Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, vol. 50.2-3 (2015), pp. 155-174
Abstract: Most Western cultures place a great value on autonomy. American society in particular has always stressed the need to succeed via self-reliance, a characteristic which, in recent decades, has additionally manifested itself in an increasing inclination for self-examination reflected in the deluge of autobiographical writing, especially memoirs. This analysis focuses on memoirs of spousal loss, a specific subgenre of life writing in which, due to the loss of a loved one, the narrating self realizes how unstable a sense of autonomy is. In their bereavement narratives, Joan Didion, Anne Roiphe, and Joyce Carol Oates admit that after losing a life partner their world crumbled and so did their sense of self. The article examines the following aspects of the grieving self: 1. how grief tests one’s self-sufficiency; 2. how various grief reactions contribute to self-disintegration; 3. the widow as a new and undesirable identity; and 4. writing as a way of regaining one’s sense of self.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10593/19242
ISSN: 0081-6272
Appears in Collections:Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, 2015 vol. 50.2-3

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