Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10593/26605
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dc.contributor.authorTrudgill, Peter-
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-11T13:18:01Z-
dc.date.available2022-01-11T13:18:01Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationStudia Anglica Posnaniensia, vol. 56s1 (2021), pp. 451-463.pl
dc.identifier.issn0081-6272-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10593/26605-
dc.description.abstractIn the 17th century, the English region of East Anglia contained many of the major population centres of the British Isles, not least Norwich, England’s second city at that time. One might therefore predict that East Anglian dialects of English would have played a major role in determining the nature of the new colonial Englishes which were first beginning to emerge during this period. This paper considers some of the phonological and grammatical features of East Anglian English which can be argued to have been influential in this way.pl
dc.language.isoengpl
dc.publisherAdam Mickiewicz Universitypl
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesspl
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/pl/*
dc.subjectEast Angliapl
dc.subjectdialectspl
dc.subjectcolonial Englishpl
dc.subjectCaribbean Englishpl
dc.subjectAmerican Englishpl
dc.subjectAustralasian Englishpl
dc.titleThe East Anglian dialect of English in the worldpl
dc.typeArtykułpl
dc.identifier.doi10.2478/stap-2021-0004-
Appears in Collections:Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, 2021 vol. 56s1

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