Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10593/3783
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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Joseph Hillis-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T11:34:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-13T11:34:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPrzestrzenie Teorii, nr 17, 2012, str. 219-243pl_PL
dc.identifier.isbn978-83-232-2449-5-
dc.identifier.issn1644-6763-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10593/3783-
dc.description.abstractThe essay in question is the translation of the fourth chapter of J. Hillis Miller’s book, On literature (2002), in which he circles around questions elemental yet convoluted for literary criticism. Miller reminds us about (as ancient as archetypal) dilemmas concerning the role of literature in society (e.g. Plato’s putdown of poetry and Aristotle’s defense of it) and discloses contemporary judgments covertly rooted in them. The fundamental issue is why Western culture has granted literature such great authority. His argument reposes on an assumption that literary works give us access to virtual realities that are not otherwise knowable.pl_PL
dc.language.isoplpl_PL
dc.publisherWydawnictwo Naukowe UAM w Poznaniupl_PL
dc.titlePo co czytać literaturę?pl_PL
dc.title.alternativeWhy read literature?pl_PL
dc.typeArtykułpl_PL
Appears in Collections:Przestrzenie Teorii, 2012, nr 17

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